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Six angry girls
2020
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When her promising senior year is upended by devastating setbacks, including her expulsion from the Mock Trial team that voted girls out after she spent three years leading it to success, Raina finds a new sense of purpose at a politically active craft store, where she becomes inspired to create a rival all-girls team. Simultaneous eBook. - (Baker & Taylor)

When her promising senior year is upended by devastating setbacks, including her expulsion from the Mock Trial team that voted girls out after she spent three years leading it to success, Raina finds a new sense of purpose at a politically active craft store, where she becomes inspired to create a rival all-girls team. - (Baker & Taylor)

Adrienne Kisner's Six Angry Girls is a story of mock trial, feminism, and the inherent power found in a pair of knitting needles.

Raina Petree is crushing her senior year, until her boyfriend dumps her, the drama club (basically) dumps her, the college of her dreams slips away, and her arch-nemesis triumphs.

Things aren’t much better for Millie Goodwin. Her father treats her like a servant, and the all-boy Mock Trial team votes her out, even after she spent the last three years helping to build its success.

But then, an advice columnist unexpectedly helps Raina find new purpose in a pair of knitting needles and a politically active local yarn store. This leads to an unlikely meeting in the girls’ bathroom, where Raina inspires Millie to start a rival team. The two join together and recruit four other angry girls to not only take on Mock Trial, but to smash the patriarchy in the process.

- (McMillan Palgrave)

Author Biography

Adrienne Kisner knits often with more enthusiasm than skill. She is the author of Dear Rachel Maddow and The Confusion of Laurel Graham and is also a graduate of Vermont College of Fine Arts with an MFA in writing for children and young adults. - (McMillan Palgrave)

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Booklist Reviews

Feminism, intersectionality, and lots of therapeutic knitting abound in this senior-year story about girls who have flippin' had it with the injustices around them as well as those committed against them. Enter Raina, recently heartbroken and questioning whether drama is really her direction after years of giving her life to it. Next, meet Millie, who lives and breathes mock trial and is pushed out of the team by the boys during her final year. Having been wronged, the two young ladies team up and form their own, all-female rival team. And they prove, without a shadow of a doubt, that the court is no match for these angry girls. The courtroom drama coupled with the drama-kid cast is a clever nod to the classic play Twelve Angry Men, and by the end, readers will be inspired to take up anatomical knitting and yarn bombing. Amid all the patriarchy-smashing and friendship, the novel also dips into romance and preparing for college. This cheerworthy novel features a diverse group of girls powerfully refusing to be underestimated and finding strength in their common anger. Grades 9-12. Copyright 2020 Booklist Reviews.

School Library Journal Reviews

Gr 9 Up—After winter break, Raina and Millie's senior year goes downhill. Raina is abruptly dumped by her boyfriend and her drama club rejects her. The mock trial team, which Millie has devoted her life to, suddenly boots her, resulting in a boy-only team. When Raina writes to a local advice column which suggests a hobby where she uses her hands, she joins an activist knitting group that uses their craft to make political statements. Raina also finds Millie crying in the school bathroom, and when they share their stories, Raina suggests that they form their own team. When a competition assigns the team a side that doesn't align with their feminist values, they must choose between winning and doing the right thing. Told in legal documents, this is a fast-paced read full of humor (sometimes about knitted genitalia), passion, and realistic life problems, with a diverse cast of well-developed characters. Millie is asexual and interested in women, and while many of the characters rarely assign a word to their sexuality, they are not all cisgender or heterosexual. Millie has dark hair and eyes, while Raina's background and appearance aren't specified. Kisner raises important points about what it means to identify as a woman, and about traditional values and gender roles. The plot comes together nicely, and the ending is not too optimistic but includes a touch of happily-ever-after, and the uncertainty that can come with major life transitions. VERDICT Kisner's diverse, impassioned, and witty novel about smashing the patriarchy will leave readers feeling empowered. A must-have for any library collection.—Liz Anderson, DC P.L.

Copyright 2020 School Library Journal.

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